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Non league boss helps save life of ill fan at Aston Villa v Leicester

Non league boss Keith Draper helps save the life of an ill fan at Aston Villa v Leicester following Sunday afternoon’s Premier League clash.

Three supporters of the West Midlands outfit supporters delivered ‘excellent CPR’ to a gentleman who collapsed as he was leaving the ground.

Emergency workers praised the trio for saving the male’s life as he was taken to hospital for further care after the group’s best efforts to rush over and help.

Non league boss helps save life of ill fan at Aston Villa v Leicester

Keith Draper, Joe Tilley and Jamie Canning were exiting Villa Park when they suddenly saw a man slumped over his steering wheel.

The group drastically took action, taking turns to perform CPR while waiting for an ambulance to arrive, as the man didn’t have a pulse.

Mr Tilley, from Longbridge, had been at the match against the Foxes with Mr Canning, and told BBC West Midlands. at about 18:30 GMT, “we were just walking back to the car, I glanced across and could see an unresponsive man.”

After removing his seat belt and laying him down on the road, Draper, who is the first team manager of Midland League Division Two outfit Fairfield Villa, rushed over to help, while someone in the crowd called for an ambulance.

“I’ve never given CPR before and neither have the other guys,” he said.

“A police officer told us, ‘you guys have saved his life’,” Mr Tilley added. The victim was said to be “conscious and alive in the back of the ambulance” but the group were still waiting to hear more from the club.

Fairfield Villa posted via their Twitter account, paying tribute to their boss, writing: “Proud of our gaffer Keith Draper who saved a guys life at Villa park today performing CPR for 10 minutes until an ambulance arrived. Top work from a top bloke.”

West Midlands Ambulance Service said the fans had performed “excellent CPR” and the patient was taken to City Hospital in Birmingham for further care.

“I’m not a hero, I just did what I could to save a guy’s life,” Mr Draper said. “I’m hoping there’s been a good outcome.”

L-R Joe Tilley and Jamie Canning

Joe Tilley (left) with his brother-in-law Jamie Canning (right)

Keith Draper
Fairfield Villa manager Keith Draper

Social media users reacted as the non league boss and two other fans helps save a life of an ill fan at Aston Villa v Leicester…

@Alice_robinson7 : This is amazing

@jpjarsingh07 : Legends all of you. God bless you all

@DavidGrainger2 : Great effort from you all

@davebytheway: Absolutely inspirational! That’s a great example of men knowing what they are doing and shows everyone should get this kind of training. Well done lads, hold your heads really high

@gladesfc: That’s a bigger win than anything you can do on the pitch. Great work – imagine how different Christmas would have been for that family without your intervention 👍

@ HarveyyAvfcc : Life saver. literally

@Daveboy_99: Fantastic bloke on and off the field. Known him 5 weeks and as a manger he been brilliant and off the field he been a class act. Well done Keith

@Stutter_92 : Best fans in the world

@waynemitch2015: I seen this incident after the match but didnt realise it was Keith at time, he did some unbelievable work to save that guys life 👏👏👏👏 Hopefully he now makes a full recovery 🙏

@guilforda : Full respect to these guys last night. Real heroe’s. Hopefully @AVFCOfficial will be able to ‘look after them’ for a game. Hopefully the gentleman pulled through.

@Cragishakespea1 : Hero

@Villalionz : Legend

MORE ON CPR

If someone is unconscious and not breathing normally, call 999 and start CPR straight away.

When you call for an ambulance, telephone systems now exist that can give basic life-saving instructions, including advice about CPR.

ON ADULTS:

If you have been trained in CPR, including rescue breaths, and feel confident using your skills, you should give chest compressions with rescue breaths.

If you’re not completely confident, attempt hands-only CPR instead.

Hands-only CPR

To carry out a chest compression:

  1. Place the heel of your hand on the breastbone at the centre of the person’s chest. Place your other hand on top of your first hand and interlock your fingers.
  2. Position yourself with your shoulders above your hands.
  3. Using your body weight (not just your arms), press straight down by 5 to 6cm (2 to 2.5 inches) on their chest.
  4. Keeping your hands on their chest, release the compression and allow the chest to return to its original position.
  5. Repeat these compressions at a rate of 100 to 120 times a minute until an ambulance arrives or you become exhausted.

CPR with rescue breaths

  1. Place the heel of your hand on the centre of the person’s chest, then place the other hand on top and press down by 5 to 6cm (2 to 2.5 inches) at a steady rate of 100 to 120 compressions a minute.
  2. After every 30 chest compressions, give 2 rescue breaths.
  3. Tilt the casualty’s head gently and lift the chin up with 2 fingers. Pinch the person’s nose. Seal your mouth over their mouth, and blow steadily and firmly into their mouth for about 1 second. Check that their chest rises. Give 2 rescue breaths.
  4. Continue with cycles of 30 chest compressions and 2 rescue breaths until they begin to recover or emergency help arrives.

CPR on children

You should carry out CPR with rescue breaths on a child. It’s more likely children will have a problem with their airways and breathing than a problem with their heart.

Children over 1 year

  1. Open the child’s airway by placing 1 hand on their forehead and gently tilting their head back and lifting the chin. Remove any visible obstructions from the mouth and nose.
  2. Pinch their nose. Seal your mouth over their mouth, and blow steadily and firmly into their mouth, checking that their chest rises. Give 5 initial rescue breaths.
  3. Place the heel of 1 hand on the centre of their chest and push down by 5cm (about 2 inches), which is approximately one-third of the chest diameter. The quality (depth) of chest compressions is very important. Use 2 hands if you can’t achieve a depth of 5cm using 1 hand.
  4. After every 30 chest compressions at a rate of 100 to 120 a minute, give 2 breaths.
  5. Continue with cycles of 30 chest compressions and 2 rescue breaths until they begin to recover or emergency help arrives.

Infants under 1 year

  1. Open the infant’s airway by placing 1 hand on their forehead and gently tilting the head back and lifting the chin. Remove any visible obstructions from the mouth and nose.
  2. Place your mouth over the mouth and nose of the infant and blow steadily and firmly into their mouth, checking that their chest rises. Give 5 initial rescue breaths.
  3. Place 2 fingers in the middle of the chest and push down by 4cm (about 1.5 inches), which is approximately one-third of the chest diameter. The quality (depth) of chest compressions is very important. Use the heel of 1 hand if you can’t achieve a depth of 4cm using the tips of 2 fingers.
  4. After 30 chest compressions at a rate of 100 to 120 a minute, give 2 rescue breaths.
  5. Continue with cycles of 30 chest compressions and 2 rescue breaths until they begin to recover or emergency help arrives.
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