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England fans face ban from singing and dressing up with Qatar police worried it’ll cause offence

England fans face a ban from singing and dressing up with Qatar police worried it’ll cause offence with chanting already getting complaints.

The English support, who wanted to cheer on their team during their World Cup campaign, are now being silenced by Qatar police, who have banned public singing.

After noise complaints were made about the Gulf state’s public transportation network, it was suggested that Three Lions’ loud supporters could be subject to sanctions.

They have been well-known for their ability to chant while they travel abroad and are now under threat from local officials.

Cops reportedly disciplined South American fans for loudly singing on the metro in the city after Ecuador beat Ecuador 2-0 on Sunday.

The noise was leading to anger from locals and they gestured at officers to intervene.

Following the incident, authorities warned fans to lower their volume. This could cause concern among England supporters, who are resentful at the suggestion that they might be punished for shouting too loudly.

Brandon Britz, 28, a fan who has spent £3,000 on his journey to cheer on Gareth Southgate’s side, described the attempt to silence singing fans as ‘ridiculous’.

‘This is a festival of football and they’ve invited the world here and they should’ve realised that with the World Cup comes all sorts of people, cultures and above all songs’, he told MailOnline.

‘The Qatar residents are complaining and making more noise with their objections than the fans, as the world is watching and listening. Everyone abroad can see that the World Cup should never have been held here.’

Brandon, proudly wearing his England short and scarf, added: ‘I have found it very frustrating here particularly, the beer restrictions put on fans and people continually telling me what you can do what you can’t do.’

Ashley Brown, head of supporter engagement at the Football Supporters Association, said the supporters had likely been “naive” rather then intentionally offensive or Islamophobic.

“I think it’s naivety rather than anything intentional. They’re dressing as St George, the patron saint, but perhaps they don’t really understand the implication of what they’re wearing,” Mr Brown said.

Speaking to TalkTV earlier this week, one fan in fancy dress complained about the price of accommodation at the World Cup.

“The problem is in places like Qatar, the fans are the essence of the game. We are what makes the game. It’s not the corporates, they help financially in the background, it’s us the fans that make the football and we are the football,” the man said.

Germany fan Steffan Freishmann, 49, from Dusseldorf said: ‘It is crazy to talk about too much noise from fans.

‘We will all carry on singing. Football is bad enough without beer. Without singing it is absolutely nothing

‘The Argentinians were very loud last night in Doha, but nobody complained. It is not a problem.’

It all happened as supporters dressed up as Christian crusaders caused a stir Qatar, with one even criticising the conservative Muslim regime’s treatment of their supporters on live television.

Some Doha residents may have been offended by the choice in outfit. This is because of the religious wars between 1095-1291, which were about Islamic control over holy sites and land.

Crusaders in St George costumes and their supporters have been a regular sight at matches in England over the years. But the fancy dress will be much more controversial at the first World Cup held in a Muslim country.

A spokesman for Kick It Out, a charity campaigning against racism and discrimination in football, warned fans against wearing knight costumes in Qatar.

Footage taken from Qatar showed the group singing God Save the King, and then storming up the stairs of public transport. Some locals were shocked at their choice of clothes, while others requested that they pose for photos.

This latest incident comes after days of growing criticism about the Qatari police’s brutal handling of fans during the ongoing row over LGBT symbols in the Gulf state.

Qatari officials repeatedly said that all are welcome at the World Cup, despite it being illegal for same-sex relationships to be established in Qatar.

England and other countries that planned to wear the OneLove armbands in protest of discrimination at the World Cup in Qatar were also said be being ‘blackmailed’ with threats of’massive sporting sanction’.

Journalists and fans from many countries have reported that officials confiscated rainbow-themed items such as flags, bucket hats, and t-shirts.

FIFA insists that “all are welcome” in the Gulf state. However, LGBT groups, journalists, and fans have been subject to an authoritarian crackdown. Stadiums were seized of rainbow clothing.

Qatari officials made a dramatic 11-hour turnaround and banned beer from stadiums. This left many FIFA fans furious.

Qatar’s Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani asked all visitors to respect the culture of Qatar. Fans are expected to follow the rules and practices of the Gulf state.

This comes after days of criticism about the Qatari police’s brutal handling of fans during the ongoing row over LGBT symbols in the Gulf state.

Qatari officials repeatedly said that all are welcome at the World Cup, despite it being illegal for same-sex relationships to be established in Qatar.

England and other countries that planned to wear the OneLove armbands in protest of discrimination at the World Cup in Qatar were also said be being ‘blackmailed’ with threats of’massive sporting sanction’.

Journalists and fans from many countries have reported that officials confiscated rainbow-themed items such as flags, bucket hats, and t-shirts.

Conservative MP Alicia Kearns, chair of the Commons Foreign Affairs Committee, warned ‘nothing about their [Qatar’s] behaviour has changed’ since they were controversially handed the rights to host the World Cup more than a decade ago.

When asked about her hopes for the tournament to deliver change in Qatar, Ms Kearns said: ‘We should always be hopeful, but I do not meaningfully believe that holding the World Cup in Qatar is going to change anything on the ground.

‘Because if it was going to, we wouldn’t have seen human rights abuses taking place, there wouldn’t have been the loss of life that we’ve seen taking place.

‘So I really don’t think, unfortunately – and I wish this was not the case – that we can have any hope that things will meaningfully change.’

Downing Street said it is closely monitoring the treatment of UK fans at the World Cup – after reports emerged of Welsh female supporters wearing rainbow bucket hats having them confiscated by stadium security.

Former national team captain Laura McAllister, now a professor at Cardiff University, told ITV News that security guards told her that her hat was ‘a banned symbol’, however she managed to sneak it through in her handbag.

She said: ‘I pointed out that FIFA had made lots of comments about supporting LGBT rights in this tournament, and said to them that coming from a nation where we’re very passionate about equality for all people, I wasn’t going to take my hat off.’

‘They were insistent that unless I took the hat off we weren’t actually allowed to come into the stadium.’

McAllister added: ‘I think we’ve had plenty of warning that this wasn’t going to be a tournament where human rights, LGBT rights and women’s rights were going to be well respected, but coming from a nation like Wales, we were very keen that we still took a stand coming here.’

Mark Roberts, Cheshire Chief Constable and English National Football Lead, said: “It’s a World Cup in a different part of the world with a very different culture, and I think one of my fears is that supporters not wishing to cause offence or cause problems may act in a way that inadvertently causes offence or draws attention.”


Fans reacted as reports claim England fans face a ban from singing and dressing up with Qatar police worried it’ll cause offence…

@willie375: You do know they where allowed in as long as they handed over their swords which they where allowed to collect after the game 😂 they just didn’t want them in a stadium with something that could be used as a weapon which isn’t an unreasonable request

@VileChelsea6: There’s no way this fella has gone to the Middle East dressed as a crusader😂😂😂😂😭

@GraemeBandeira: Mate, just jeans and a polo will do

@Ciagun: There are many reasons this World Cup shouldn’t be in Qatar, but going to the Middle East dressed as a crusader isn’t really going to get you the welcome you might think you deserve!

@TypeForVictory: ‘He was planning to travel dressed as the footsoldier of a murderous, theocratic, medieval regime… but as wearing Qatari dress was deemed rude, he just wore a mail coif instead.’ Get me a slot on the HIGNFY writing team.

@octa2342: bro protecting himself from sunburn and beheadings with a single outfit.

@paulbhampton: “Fans travelling to the Gulf dressed as Crusaders are the very essence of the game”
Where do you even begin?

@bcrabl100:
*cough splutter*
The World Cup and The Olympics have mainly been cash cows for the big corporations for *decades*. Host nations spend billions building infrastructure, the corporations swoop in, extract all the profit they can, then swoop out leaving the infrastructure to rot.

@LeetownLoon: Interesting choice of attire, mate. What kind of reception did he expect dressed as a crusader in the middle east?

@MajorGrubert: Started out as a rant, turned into a crusade.

@MarkKav15119614: He’s dressed as a crusader that persecuted Muslims, and he complains of being treated badly

@Stillicho82: More like a generic knight which does not necessarily mean he is on crusade.

@shep59r1: “Love… did you pack my crusader outfit? Oh, and remember my YMCA arse-less leather chaps”

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